Baritone saxophone is a term used to describe any horrible looking torture and/or murder weapon from 1392 to 1645. While many consider the baritone saxophone to be merely a giant version of the saxophone, the history of the baritone saxophone is actually much greater and extensive.

 

curtaltarac:

Gary’s Bari through the silver plating process. #musicmedic #saxproshop #uberhaul #saxophone

curtaltarac:

Gary’s Bari through the silver plating process. #musicmedic #saxproshop #uberhaul #saxophone

michaelparque:

FRANCOIS CORNELOUP @ CHU, Nantes 29/08/2014

Les Rendez Vous de l’Erdre / action culturelle

Copyright Michael Parque 2014

The baritone and soprano saxophonist points as main characteristics of his playing the option to engage in egoless, colective, situations (“Instinct grégaire” is the title of one of his compositions, telling everything about this attitude) and to risk in foreign music territories, either using popular themes or more difficult sound constructions. A selflearned musician, he worked with the likes of Bernard Lubat, Claude Barthelemy, Henri Texier and Gérard Marais, and is involved in a great quantity of projects, including a baritone trio with Daunik Lazro and Serge Bertocchi, a duo with Sylvain Kassap and participations in the Hélène Labarrière Quartet, the Collectif Zhivaro, the Louis Sclavis Quintet, the groups Oeil de Breizh and Grand Lousadzak, among others. Leader of his own groups, and co-leader of others, François Raulin, Claude Tchamitchian, Eric Echampard, Philippe Deschepper, Fabrice Charles, Vincent Courtois, Médéric Collignon, Marc Ducret and Yves Robert are his most regular partners. Better company in France is impossible. In some of his work, Corneloup abandons the solistic-melodic role of the saxophonist to act like a bassist, and in that way positioning himself at the heart of the structures (“with the baritone, that’s easy, and I can always get out, such are the lyric possibilities of this instrument”, he tells). With a classicaly inspired perspective of how to structure an improvisation, François Corneloup has Messiaen and Berlioz as references, specially the later. And this because the 19th century composer creates a sort of orchestral puzzle – when combined, the pieces give not only a global logic to the composition but also its movement. That’s what the French sax player tries to do with his combos. 

http://www.cleanfeed-records.com/artista.asp?intID=150

apallafidunn:

pat patrick

November 1929 – December 31, 1991
Pat Patrick, like John Gilmore, spent virtually his entire career with Sun Ra’s Arkestra, leading to him being somewhat underrated. Patrick had a particularly appealing sound on baritone and, although he did not lead any record sessions of his own, he was one of the better baritonists of the 1950s and ’60s. As a child he studied piano, drums and trumpet before switching to saxophones. At Du SableHigh School in Chicago he first met John Gilmore. Patrick did record with John Coltrane (Africa Brass), play briefly with Duke Ellington, was a member of a little-known version of Thelonious Monk’s quartet (1970) and in 1974 he recorded with the Jazz Composer’s orchestra. But otherwise Pat Patrick from 1954 on and off until his death was closely associated with Sun Ra where he was areliable sideman. — Scott Yanow, All-Music Guide.

http://jazzbarisax.com/baritone-saxophonists/avant-garde/pat-patrick/

apallafidunn:

pat patrick

November 1929 – December 31, 1991

Pat Patrick, like John Gilmore, spent virtually his entire career with Sun Ra’s Arkestra, leading to him being somewhat underrated. Patrick had a particularly appealing sound on baritone and, although he did not lead any record sessions of his own, he was one of the better baritonists of the 1950s and ’60s. As a child he studied piano, drums and trumpet before switching to saxophones. At Du Sable
High School in Chicago he first met John Gilmore. Patrick did record with John Coltrane (Africa Brass), play briefly with Duke Ellington, was a member of a little-known version of Thelonious Monk’s quartet (1970) and in 1974 he recorded with the Jazz Composer’s orchestra. But otherwise Pat Patrick from 1954 on and off until his death was closely associated with Sun Ra where he was a
reliable sideman. — Scott Yanow, All-Music Guide.
gariboldi:

In the USSR and Eastern Europe in the 1950s underground night spots would play music pirated from the west. The only media they had were recorders etched into discarded X-ray film.
http://kk.org/streetuse/2006/08/jazz-on-bones-xray-sound-recor-1/

gariboldi:

In the USSR and Eastern Europe in the 1950s underground night spots would play music pirated from the west. The only media they had were recorders etched into discarded X-ray film.

http://kk.org/streetuse/2006/08/jazz-on-bones-xray-sound-recor-1/

curtaltarac:

We’re just finishing up the COA’s on this impressive line up from Georgia Southern! #musicmedic #saxproshop #saxophone

curtaltarac:

We’re just finishing up the COA’s on this impressive line up from Georgia Southern! #musicmedic #saxproshop #saxophone

Multi-woodwind maestro, Arlen Asher is one of New Mexico’s long-standing jazz luminaries. Born in 1929 in a small farming community in Missouri, Asher moved to Albuquerque in 1958. Prior to becoming a full time musician, he worked as an award-winning producer and announcer for KNME-TV, KOB-TV and KHFM radio. He left broadcasting to establish a private woodwind studio in 1965 and since then has been teaching woodwind fundamentals and jazz improvisation to hundreds of students throughout the US. In the 1970’s, he formed the Arlen Asher-Bob Brown Quartet, which formed the basis of two jazz television series for KNME-TV and a series of concerts that included guest artists such as trumpeter Clark Terry.

Multi-woodwind maestro, Arlen Asher is one of New Mexico’s long-standing jazz luminaries. Born in 1929 in a small farming community in Missouri, Asher moved to Albuquerque in 1958. Prior to becoming a full time musician, he worked as an award-winning producer and announcer for KNME-TV, KOB-TV and KHFM radio. He left broadcasting to establish a private woodwind studio in 1965 and since then has been teaching woodwind fundamentals and jazz improvisation to hundreds of students throughout the US. In the 1970’s, he formed the Arlen Asher-Bob Brown Quartet, which formed the basis of two jazz television series for KNME-TV and a series of concerts that included guest artists such as trumpeter Clark Terry.